Agrobiodiversity and land-use change in Serbia: an integrated biodiversity assessment of key functional groups of arthropods and plant pathogens

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Agrobiodiversity and land-use change in Serbia: an integrated biodiversity assessment of key functional groups of arthropods and plant pathogens (en)
Агробиодиверзитет и коришћење земљишта у Србији: интегрисана процена биодиверзитета кључних група артропода и биљних патогена (sr)
Agrobiodiverzitet i korišćenje zemljišta u Srbiji: integrisana procena biodiverziteta ključnih grupa artropoda i biljnih patogena (sr_RS)
Authors

Publications

Resource allocation in response to herbivory and gall formation in Linaria vulgaris

Zorić, A.S.; Morina, F.; Toševski, Ivo; Tosti, Tomislav; Jović, Jelena; Krstić, Oliver; Veljović-Jovanović, Sonja

(Elsevier Masson SAS, 2019)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Zorić, A.S.
AU  - Morina, F.
AU  - Toševski, Ivo
AU  - Tosti, Tomislav
AU  - Jović, Jelena
AU  - Krstić, Oliver
AU  - Veljović-Jovanović, Sonja
PY  - 2019
UR  - https://cherry.chem.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/2804
AB  - Trehalose and its precursor, trehalose 6-phosphate (T6P), are essential regulators of plant response to abiotic and biotic stress. Here we used the specific host-insect interaction between Linaria vulgaris (Plantaginaceae) and stem-galling weevil, Rhinusa pilosa (Mecinini, Curculionidae) with the aim to distinguish carbohydrate allocation patterns in response to herbivory, gall formation (G1, 24 h after oviposition), and gall development (G2, 7 days after oviposition) under controlled conditions. The hypothesis is that herbivory and galling induce distinct responses in both leaves and stems, and that shifts in carbon allocations are regulated by signaling sugars. Systemic response to herbivory was accumulation of T6P and maltose. The main feature of G1 in the stems was accumulation of trehalose, accompanied by increased T6P, turanose and glucose content, oppositely to the leaves. In G2, galls had 3-folds higher weight than controls, with further accumulation of fructose, glucose, turanose, and total water-insoluble carbohydrates (TIC), while the sucrose/hexose ratio decreased. Analysis of fast chlorophyll fluorescence kinetic (OJIP) transients in G2 showed a slight decrease in quantum yield of electron transport flux from QA to QB, and towards photosystem I acceptor side, correlated with the decreased content of photosynthetic pigments and hexoses accumulation. Redistribution of photosynthates, and accumulation of T6P were induced in response to herbivory, indicating its signaling role. The results support the hypothesis that R. pilosa can induce plant reprogramming towards the accumulation of beneficial carbohydrates in developing gall by mechanisms which include both T6P and trehalose.
PB  - Elsevier Masson SAS
T2  - Plant Physiology and Biochemistry
T1  - Resource allocation in response to herbivory and gall formation in Linaria vulgaris
VL  - 135
SP  - 224
EP  - 232
DO  - 10.1016/j.plaphy.2018.11.032
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Zorić, A.S. and Morina, F. and Toševski, Ivo and Tosti, Tomislav and Jović, Jelena and Krstić, Oliver and Veljović-Jovanović, Sonja",
year = "2019",
abstract = "Trehalose and its precursor, trehalose 6-phosphate (T6P), are essential regulators of plant response to abiotic and biotic stress. Here we used the specific host-insect interaction between Linaria vulgaris (Plantaginaceae) and stem-galling weevil, Rhinusa pilosa (Mecinini, Curculionidae) with the aim to distinguish carbohydrate allocation patterns in response to herbivory, gall formation (G1, 24 h after oviposition), and gall development (G2, 7 days after oviposition) under controlled conditions. The hypothesis is that herbivory and galling induce distinct responses in both leaves and stems, and that shifts in carbon allocations are regulated by signaling sugars. Systemic response to herbivory was accumulation of T6P and maltose. The main feature of G1 in the stems was accumulation of trehalose, accompanied by increased T6P, turanose and glucose content, oppositely to the leaves. In G2, galls had 3-folds higher weight than controls, with further accumulation of fructose, glucose, turanose, and total water-insoluble carbohydrates (TIC), while the sucrose/hexose ratio decreased. Analysis of fast chlorophyll fluorescence kinetic (OJIP) transients in G2 showed a slight decrease in quantum yield of electron transport flux from QA to QB, and towards photosystem I acceptor side, correlated with the decreased content of photosynthetic pigments and hexoses accumulation. Redistribution of photosynthates, and accumulation of T6P were induced in response to herbivory, indicating its signaling role. The results support the hypothesis that R. pilosa can induce plant reprogramming towards the accumulation of beneficial carbohydrates in developing gall by mechanisms which include both T6P and trehalose.",
publisher = "Elsevier Masson SAS",
journal = "Plant Physiology and Biochemistry",
title = "Resource allocation in response to herbivory and gall formation in Linaria vulgaris",
volume = "135",
pages = "224-232",
doi = "10.1016/j.plaphy.2018.11.032"
}
Zorić, A.S., Morina, F., Toševski, I., Tosti, T., Jović, J., Krstić, O.,& Veljović-Jovanović, S.. (2019). Resource allocation in response to herbivory and gall formation in Linaria vulgaris. in Plant Physiology and Biochemistry
Elsevier Masson SAS., 135, 224-232.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.plaphy.2018.11.032
Zorić A, Morina F, Toševski I, Tosti T, Jović J, Krstić O, Veljović-Jovanović S. Resource allocation in response to herbivory and gall formation in Linaria vulgaris. in Plant Physiology and Biochemistry. 2019;135:224-232.
doi:10.1016/j.plaphy.2018.11.032 .
Zorić, A.S., Morina, F., Toševski, Ivo, Tosti, Tomislav, Jović, Jelena, Krstić, Oliver, Veljović-Jovanović, Sonja, "Resource allocation in response to herbivory and gall formation in Linaria vulgaris" in Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, 135 (2019):224-232,
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.plaphy.2018.11.032 . .
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Comparative analysis of phenolic profiles of ovipositional fluid of Rhinusa pilosa (Mecinini, Curculionidae) and its host plant Linaria vulgaris (Plantaginaceae)

Sedlarević, Ana; Morina, Filis; Toševski, Ivo; Gašić, Uroš M.; Natić, Maja; Jović, Jelena; Krstić, Oliver; Veljović-Jovanović, Sonja

(Springer, Dordrecht, 2016)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Sedlarević, Ana
AU  - Morina, Filis
AU  - Toševski, Ivo
AU  - Gašić, Uroš M.
AU  - Natić, Maja
AU  - Jović, Jelena
AU  - Krstić, Oliver
AU  - Veljović-Jovanović, Sonja
PY  - 2016
UR  - https://cherry.chem.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/2279
AB  - Rhinusa pilosa (Gyllenhal) is a highly specific weevil that induces stem galls on the common toadflax Linaria vulgaris Mill. females oviposit the eggs near the apex of a growing shoot. The act of oviposition is accompanied by secretion of an ovipositional fluid, which is considered to be cecidogen, directly involved in gall induction. The remains of cecidogenic fluid were collected from the surface of the oviposition point on the stem. We performed a comparative analysis of the phenolics extracted from cecidogen, the stem and galls of L. vulgaris and adult and larva of R. pilosa by HPLC-DAD. One compound with A (max) at 273, 332 nm (R (t) 30.65 min) was exclusively found in the methanol extract of cecidogen. To further characterize the cecidogen and stem phenolic profiles, we used UHPLC coupled with an OrbiTrap mass analyzer. Among 49 phenolic compounds extracted from both the ovipositional fluid and the plant, protocatechuic acid and two phenolic glycosides were exclusively found in cecidogen: diosmetin-O-acetylrutinoside and an unidentified compound. The unknown compound produced an MS2 base peak at 387 and 327 and 267 m/z base peaks at MS3 and MS4 fragmentation, respectively, and had the molecular formula C32H31O18. The plausible role of phenolic compounds in the induction of gall formation on L. vulgaris is discussed.
PB  - Springer, Dordrecht
T2  - Arthropod-Plant Interactions
T1  - Comparative analysis of phenolic profiles of ovipositional fluid of Rhinusa pilosa (Mecinini, Curculionidae) and its host plant Linaria vulgaris (Plantaginaceae)
VL  - 10
IS  - 4
SP  - 311
EP  - 322
DO  - 10.1007/s11829-016-9435-y
UR  - Kon_3095
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Sedlarević, Ana and Morina, Filis and Toševski, Ivo and Gašić, Uroš M. and Natić, Maja and Jović, Jelena and Krstić, Oliver and Veljović-Jovanović, Sonja",
year = "2016",
abstract = "Rhinusa pilosa (Gyllenhal) is a highly specific weevil that induces stem galls on the common toadflax Linaria vulgaris Mill. females oviposit the eggs near the apex of a growing shoot. The act of oviposition is accompanied by secretion of an ovipositional fluid, which is considered to be cecidogen, directly involved in gall induction. The remains of cecidogenic fluid were collected from the surface of the oviposition point on the stem. We performed a comparative analysis of the phenolics extracted from cecidogen, the stem and galls of L. vulgaris and adult and larva of R. pilosa by HPLC-DAD. One compound with A (max) at 273, 332 nm (R (t) 30.65 min) was exclusively found in the methanol extract of cecidogen. To further characterize the cecidogen and stem phenolic profiles, we used UHPLC coupled with an OrbiTrap mass analyzer. Among 49 phenolic compounds extracted from both the ovipositional fluid and the plant, protocatechuic acid and two phenolic glycosides were exclusively found in cecidogen: diosmetin-O-acetylrutinoside and an unidentified compound. The unknown compound produced an MS2 base peak at 387 and 327 and 267 m/z base peaks at MS3 and MS4 fragmentation, respectively, and had the molecular formula C32H31O18. The plausible role of phenolic compounds in the induction of gall formation on L. vulgaris is discussed.",
publisher = "Springer, Dordrecht",
journal = "Arthropod-Plant Interactions",
title = "Comparative analysis of phenolic profiles of ovipositional fluid of Rhinusa pilosa (Mecinini, Curculionidae) and its host plant Linaria vulgaris (Plantaginaceae)",
volume = "10",
number = "4",
pages = "311-322",
doi = "10.1007/s11829-016-9435-y",
url = "Kon_3095"
}
Sedlarević, A., Morina, F., Toševski, I., Gašić, U. M., Natić, M., Jović, J., Krstić, O.,& Veljović-Jovanović, S.. (2016). Comparative analysis of phenolic profiles of ovipositional fluid of Rhinusa pilosa (Mecinini, Curculionidae) and its host plant Linaria vulgaris (Plantaginaceae). in Arthropod-Plant Interactions
Springer, Dordrecht., 10(4), 311-322.
https://doi.org/10.1007/s11829-016-9435-y
Kon_3095
Sedlarević A, Morina F, Toševski I, Gašić UM, Natić M, Jović J, Krstić O, Veljović-Jovanović S. Comparative analysis of phenolic profiles of ovipositional fluid of Rhinusa pilosa (Mecinini, Curculionidae) and its host plant Linaria vulgaris (Plantaginaceae). in Arthropod-Plant Interactions. 2016;10(4):311-322.
doi:10.1007/s11829-016-9435-y
Kon_3095 .
Sedlarević, Ana, Morina, Filis, Toševski, Ivo, Gašić, Uroš M., Natić, Maja, Jović, Jelena, Krstić, Oliver, Veljović-Jovanović, Sonja, "Comparative analysis of phenolic profiles of ovipositional fluid of Rhinusa pilosa (Mecinini, Curculionidae) and its host plant Linaria vulgaris (Plantaginaceae)" in Arthropod-Plant Interactions, 10, no. 4 (2016):311-322,
https://doi.org/10.1007/s11829-016-9435-y .,
Kon_3095 .
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In vitro and in vivo antifungal properties of cysteine proteinase inhibitor from green kiwifruit

Popović, Milica M.; Bulajic, Aleksandra; Ristic, Danijela; Krstic, Branka; Jankov, Ratko M.; Gavrović-Jankulović, Marija

(Wiley-Blackwell, Hoboken, 2012)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Popović, Milica M.
AU  - Bulajic, Aleksandra
AU  - Ristic, Danijela
AU  - Krstic, Branka
AU  - Jankov, Ratko M.
AU  - Gavrović-Jankulović, Marija
PY  - 2012
UR  - https://cherry.chem.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/1545
AB  - BACKGROUND: Higher plants possess several mechanisms of defense against plant pathogens. Proteins actively synthesized in response to those stresses are called defense-related proteins which, among others, include certain protease inhibitors. It is of particular relevance to investigate plant natural defense mechanisms for pathogen control which include cystatinsspecific inhibitors of cysteine proteases. RESULTS: In this study, a cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CPI), 11 kDa in size, was purified from green kiwifruit to homogeneity. Immuno-tissue print results indicated that CPI is most abundant in the outer layer of pericarp, near the peel, and the inner most part of the pulpsites where it could act as a natural barrier against pathogens entering the fruit. The purified protein (15 mu mol L-1) showed antifungal activity against two phytopathogenic fungi (Alternaria radicina and Botrytis cinerea) by inhibiting fungal spore germination. In vivo, CPI (10 mu mol L-1) was able to prevent artificial infection of apple and carrot with spore suspension of B. cinerea and A. radicina, respectively. It also exerted activity on both intracellular and fermentation fluid proteinases. CONCLUSION: Identification and characterization of plant defense molecules is the first step towards creation of improved methods for pathogen control based on naturally occurring molecules. Copyright (c) 2012 Society of Chemical Industry
PB  - Wiley-Blackwell, Hoboken
T2  - Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
T1  - In vitro and in vivo antifungal properties of cysteine proteinase inhibitor from green kiwifruit
VL  - 92
IS  - 15
SP  - 3072
EP  - 3078
DO  - 10.1002/jsfa.5728
UR  - Kon_2376
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Popović, Milica M. and Bulajic, Aleksandra and Ristic, Danijela and Krstic, Branka and Jankov, Ratko M. and Gavrović-Jankulović, Marija",
year = "2012",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Higher plants possess several mechanisms of defense against plant pathogens. Proteins actively synthesized in response to those stresses are called defense-related proteins which, among others, include certain protease inhibitors. It is of particular relevance to investigate plant natural defense mechanisms for pathogen control which include cystatinsspecific inhibitors of cysteine proteases. RESULTS: In this study, a cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CPI), 11 kDa in size, was purified from green kiwifruit to homogeneity. Immuno-tissue print results indicated that CPI is most abundant in the outer layer of pericarp, near the peel, and the inner most part of the pulpsites where it could act as a natural barrier against pathogens entering the fruit. The purified protein (15 mu mol L-1) showed antifungal activity against two phytopathogenic fungi (Alternaria radicina and Botrytis cinerea) by inhibiting fungal spore germination. In vivo, CPI (10 mu mol L-1) was able to prevent artificial infection of apple and carrot with spore suspension of B. cinerea and A. radicina, respectively. It also exerted activity on both intracellular and fermentation fluid proteinases. CONCLUSION: Identification and characterization of plant defense molecules is the first step towards creation of improved methods for pathogen control based on naturally occurring molecules. Copyright (c) 2012 Society of Chemical Industry",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell, Hoboken",
journal = "Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture",
title = "In vitro and in vivo antifungal properties of cysteine proteinase inhibitor from green kiwifruit",
volume = "92",
number = "15",
pages = "3072-3078",
doi = "10.1002/jsfa.5728",
url = "Kon_2376"
}
Popović, M. M., Bulajic, A., Ristic, D., Krstic, B., Jankov, R. M.,& Gavrović-Jankulović, M.. (2012). In vitro and in vivo antifungal properties of cysteine proteinase inhibitor from green kiwifruit. in Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
Wiley-Blackwell, Hoboken., 92(15), 3072-3078.
https://doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.5728
Kon_2376
Popović MM, Bulajic A, Ristic D, Krstic B, Jankov RM, Gavrović-Jankulović M. In vitro and in vivo antifungal properties of cysteine proteinase inhibitor from green kiwifruit. in Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture. 2012;92(15):3072-3078.
doi:10.1002/jsfa.5728
Kon_2376 .
Popović, Milica M., Bulajic, Aleksandra, Ristic, Danijela, Krstic, Branka, Jankov, Ratko M., Gavrović-Jankulović, Marija, "In vitro and in vivo antifungal properties of cysteine proteinase inhibitor from green kiwifruit" in Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 92, no. 15 (2012):3072-3078,
https://doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.5728 .,
Kon_2376 .
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